Steve Owens: 1969 Heisman Trophy
Winner
If anyone was born to play Oklahoma football
it was 1969 Heisman winner Steve Owens.
Doc Blanchard: The Army War
Machine
Dr. Felix Anthony Blanchard, Sr. bestowed
three things to his son, 1945 Heisman Trophy
winner, "Doc" Blanchard.
Robert Benchley: A Profile in
Humor
They don't write like funny Robert Benchley
anymore. Read this article, then go to a used
book store and get a collection of his stories.
The Great Radio Hoax of 1935
Robert Benchley at the Algonquin Round
Table, critic Alexander Woolcott was the
victim of this classic con.
Alexander Woolcott
Robert Benchley
The Chieftains: A Return to Tradition
The famed Irish group is examined in this 1977 article.
.
Articles
by
David Pietrusza
Grace Coolidge: First Lady of
Baseball
The Biggest Fan in White House History
Wasn't a President-- But a First Lady.
"Wombats and Such" Grace and
Cal Coolidge and Their Pets
The Coolidge Family and Their Incredible
Menagerie of Household Pets
Eddie McDonald: The Real Ironweed
Edward McDonald--Pulitzer Prize Winning
Novelist William Kennedy's Uncle--and the
Model for
Ironweed's Francis Phelan
David Pietrusza has published articles in a wide variety
of publications, including:

The History News Network
The American Thinker
USA Today Baseball Weekly
Baseball America
Baseball Digest
Microsoft Complete Baseball
Baseball Research Journal
The National Pastime
The Heisman Journal
Catholic Digest


The following is a small sampling of his output:
WNYC Archives blog
History News Network
Elysian Fields Quarterly
OldTyme Baseball News
Play Ball!
The Diamond Angle
Nine
Ballparks Bulletin
New Mexico Magazine
Jim Plunkett: Every Underdog Has
His Day

Heisman Trophy Winner Jim Plunkett's
background gave him every excuse for
failure--he refused to take any.
Les Horvath: 1944 Heisman Trophy
Winner
Les Horvath's football debut was hardly the
most auspicious possible.
Glenn Davis: "The Real
Touchdown Twin"
Despite being dubbed the "Touchdown
Blanchard were not identical physical
specimens. Doc Blanchard, at 6' and 205
pounds, was by far the bigger of the two
football legends. The 5'9', 170 pound Davis,
however, may have been the better natural
athlete.
Jim Plunkett
Les Horvath
Ban Takes Manhattan
An Excerpt from Major Leagues: The
Formation, Sometimes Absorption and Mostly
Inevitable Demise of 18 Professional Baseball
Organizations, 1871 to Present
Byron
"Precedents, Vice Presidents—and Super-
Tickets"
From the History News Network (HNN)
Road Trips of Mark, Dick & Harry"
From the History News Network (HNN)
"'Give-'Em-Hell Barry' in 2012?"
From The American Thinker